top 10 countries with lion population

February 25, 2024

Top countries by Lion Population: There are two recognized subspecies of lions: the African lion and the Asiatic lion AFRICAN LION
1. Tanzania: Approximately 8,000 - 10,000 lions
2. Botswana: Approximately 3,000 - 3,500 lions
3. South Africa: Approximately 2,000 - 2,500 lions
4. Kenya: Approximately 2,000 lions
5. Zimbabwe: Approximately 1,500 - 2,000 lions
6. Zambia: Approximately 1,000 - 1,500 lions
7. Mozambique: Approximately 1,000 - 1,500 lions
8. Namibia: Approximately 800 - 1,000 lions
9. Angola: Approximately 800 - 1,000 lions
10. Uganda: Approximately 400 - 600 lions
ASIATIC LION
1. India: Approximately 600 - 700 lions

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Top countries by Lion Population

February 25, 2024

Top countries by Lion Population:
There are two recognized subspecies of lions:
  • African lion
  • Asiatic lion

AFRICAN LION
1. Tanzania: Approximately 8,000 - 10,000 lions
2. Botswana: Approximately 3,000 - 3,500 lions
3. South Africa: Approximately 2,000 - 2,500 lions
4. Kenya: Approximately 2,000 lions
5. Zimbabwe: Approximately 1,500 - 2,000 lions
6. Zambia: Approximately 1,000 - 1,500 lions
7. Mozambique: Approximately 1,000 - 1,500 lions
8. Namibia: Approximately 800 - 1,000 lions
9. Angola: Approximately 800 - 1,000 lions
10. Uganda: Approximately 400 - 600 lions

ASIATIC LION
1. India: Approximately 600 - 700 lions

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Asian civilization summary

February 20, 2024

This is my ranking of Asian countries in terms of their global influence and historical contribution.Image
We start with SSS,

China and India are planetary civilizations unto themselves, that influenced not only their homelands, but all of SE Asia, Central Asia, and the entire world.

Saudi Arabia birthed Islam, it is the lone country in SS as a result. Islam has shaken our world since it was born in the Arabian desert,

Modern Saudi Arabia is also in the midst of a modern renaissance.Image
In S, we have two giants in Japan and Russia that shook Asia tremendously in the 19th and 20th century.

They fail to reach SSS and SS mainly because their influence was not as dominant pre 19th century.

But what cultural giants they are.Image
In the A tier we have South Korea, Turkey, and Iran.

South Korea and Turkey are modern entertainment powerhouses, but to be master of Asia you need more than K-Pop and K-dramas or Ottoman Empire serial soap operas. They won't ever be king of the block.

Iran is a giant of Central Asia and the Middle East, immense history and architecture radiating from its land.Image
In the B Tier we have the stars of the crowded rest,

Hong Kong defined global culture in the 20th century and even in the 21st its still a gem of the Greater Bay Area,

Thailand is one of the world's most visited countries, and is a great example of the synthesis of Indian and Chinese civilization that defines Southeast Asia,

As for Palestine, it has long been a massive sympathetic cause for most of Asia and the world at large, which is why I give it the edge over Israel here.Image
In the C tier we have countries that are quite popular for both famous and infamous reasons,

Israel of course is either deeply loved or deeply hated, with no in-between it seems, it is in some ways a country that seems out of place in Asia but is home to some of its deepest fractures and dramas,

Vietnam is famous for many reasons and its culture and story deeply intertwined with China, North Korea infamous for the Kim dynasty, and last but not least Afghanistan very infamous for the long warrior accomplishments of its tribes, it has outlasted many empires.Image
D is really the last relevant tier,

we have a bunch of countries that are well known sure, but lack cultural projection to an extent,

Taiwan is basically an extension of China's celebrated Fujianese culture mixed with a few Japaneseish traits,

Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines are all famous names, but hardly anyone can name cultural products from them,

The UAE and Qatar are deeply rich but again they get lost in the broader sands of Gulf Arab culture,

Lebanon and Iraq are problem children more famous for their difficult modern era than their rich history.Image
E stands for entrenched irrelevance.

F stands for Fail, as in your country has FAILED to promote its culture globally.

I'm not even gonna mention these countries.

Do better.Image
Africa has given me so much disappointment in my life,

Europe is a proper bore and they're not the moment,

I owe North America my life, but its rather boring and it lacks the soul that lives in the Old World,

Latin America is irrelevant,

Thank God For Asia, that it exists. 

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Experience Bangalore Like a Local: Nature, Culture, and Foodie Bliss for Every Traveler

January 17, 2024


Alright, here are some names of exciting Bangalore spots, grouped by theme:

Nature & Outdoors:

  • Cubbon Park
  • Lalbagh Botanical Garden
  • Bannerghatta National Park
  • Nandi Hills
  • Ulsoor Lake

History & Culture:

  • Bangalore Palace
  • Tipu Sultan's Fort
  • Vidhana Soudha
  • Bangalore Museum
  • Indian Institute of Science

Art & Entertainment:

  • National Gallery of Modern Art
  • Chowdiah Memorial Hall
  • Rangashankara Theatre
  • Innovative Film City
  • Pub Street (MG Road)

Food & Foodie Delights:

  • VV Puram Food Street
  • Krumbs & Batter (Koramangala)
  • Empire Restaurant (Indiranagar)
  • Cafe Coffee Day (everywhere!)
  • Dosa joints galore (try Benjarong!)

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what was Moamoria Rebellion?

January 15, 2024

The Moamoria Rebellion (1769-1805) was a major uprising in the Ahom Kingdom of present-day Assam, India. It played a crucial role in weakening the kingdom and paved the way for its eventual downfall. Here's a breakdown of the rebellion:

Origins:

  • The rebellion was led by the Moamorias, also known as the Mataks, followers of the egalitarian Mayamara Sattra religious movement founded by Aniruddhadeva in the 16th century.
  • The Sattra emphasized monotheism, social equality, and rejection of caste hierarchies, which resonated with marginalized groups like the Morans and Kochs who faced discrimination under the Ahom caste system.
  • Growing dissatisfaction with the Ahom Paik system's burdens and perceived injustices further fueled the rebellion.

Course of the Rebellion:

  • The rebellion erupted in 1769 led by Krishnaram Barpatra Gohain, a Moamoria leader, demanding religious freedom and abolishment of discriminatory practices.
  • The initial stages saw Moamoria successes, capturing the Ahom capital Rangpur and even briefly installing their own king.
  • However, internal dissensions and fierce Ahom counter-offensives led to periods of fluctuating control.
  • The rebellion spanned multiple phases, each characterized by intense battles, guerilla tactics, and brutal reprisals by both sides.
  • The rebellion also received support from some discontented Ahom nobles and other ethnic groups facing hardship under the Ahom rule.

Impact and Legacy:

  • The Moamoria Rebellion significantly weakened the Ahom Kingdom:
    • Heavy manpower and resource losses, crippling the military and administration.
    • Widespread depopulation and economic disruption.
    • Loss of control over vast territories.
  • The rebellion paved the way for:
    • Burmese invasions in the late 18th century, exploiting the Ahom Kingdom's vulnerability.
    • Subsequent intervention and eventual annexation by the British East India Company in the early 19th century.
  • The Moamoria Rebellion is celebrated as a significant chapter in Assamese history for its:
    • Challenge to the feudal Ahom system and fight for social equality.
    • Contribution to Assamese cultural identity and religious diversity.

Further resources:

If you have any further questions about specific aspects of the Moamoria Rebellion or its historical context, feel free to ask!

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